Thursday, August 7, 2008

Need More Coffee!

It's one of those days-- where you just can't wake up, no matter how hard you try. The dreary, gray weather isn't helping either. Meh. I just made myself a second cup of coffee... let's hope it does the trick!


For breakfast, I toasted-up a couple of Van's Organic Waffles, which I topped with a honey-ricotta spread and sliced almonds. To make the spread, combine 2 tbsp of ricotta with 2 tsp of honey.


My breakfast also included the juiciest cantaloupe ever! I think that I picked the optimal day to cut it up and eat it. Honestly, I was so excited about the cantaloupe that I left a note for Mal this morning and told him that he just had to try some!



Today's iced coffee, lunch, and snack, packed and ready to go...


And my second cup of coffee, which I made here in the office... I'm dragging this morning.


Question of the Day

What are your favorite hybrid fruits?

Me: I'm new to this hybrid fruit thing, so please let me know what you guys like! I love any and all fruit! :)

30 Comments:

VeggieGirl said...

Ah yes, one of those days - hang in there!!

My favorite hybrid fruit = pluot (cross between a plum and an apricot). It's incredibly fragrant, sweet, juicy, and satisfying :0)

Amanda said...

wow tina are u up, breakfast eaten and out the door before Mal even gets up? Thats impressive ;)

Trish said...

Hybrid food? hmm not sure, not crazy about any food man has altered, so not sure.

I did want to tell you your breakfast looks awesome. Ricotta and honey on waffles sounds really good!

Anonymous said...

apple-bananas! they are tiny bananas that are a bit crisper than regular bananas. very popular in hawaii :)

Sara said...

I'm totally having "one of those days too!!" Bring on the coffee! Good luck with your day... :)

Caitlin said...

my favorite hybrid fruit is the UGLI fruit. The original tree is believed to have been a hybrid formed from the Seville orange, the grapefruit and the tangerine families.

Here's the website: http://www.ugli.com/about_us.html

Anonymous said...

Hi, I love your blog! I love those waffles! I will definately have to try that topping on them next time!

You dont have to answer this if you think it's too personal.. but how much do you weight and how many calories do you eat per day? .. And how many calories did you eat when you were losing weight?

Tina said...

Anon,

I am 5'3 1/2" and weigh between 127-131. Currently (and while to lose weight), I eat 1700-2200 calories a day.

c said...

The only time I have had a hybrid fruit, a pluot, I didn't like it. but those waffles look awesome!

Jessica said...

I second the pluot - TJ's had sampel of them the other day and they were great!

Tina, I LOVE your sreative sweet spreads that you come up with for breakfast and desserts. I'm going to have to write them down and make note of some to try!

sportsnutritionliving said...

The only hybrid fruit i tried was the grapple and althought it was good I prefer my fruit in its original form. They basicly cross the genes of different fruit.. i guess it has its plus and minus'. Your like me with the ricotta I love the stuff I can eat it straight out of the carton but I am always using it to make concotions.. one time i mixed it with PB and Pumpkin

Denise said...

I can't really think of any hybrid fruit... mm... need to do a little research on that first.
Now, tell me, are you taking that bottle of wine (in the background on the pic) for your afternoon snack? LOL! : )
Have an eeeasy day!
x
d

Melissa said...

I'll second you on the "needing coffee" day....I'm exhausted! Good thing it's ALMOST the weekend :)

My favorite hybrid is definitely a PLUOT! YUM!

lighterportions said...

That's probably the brightest cantaloupe I've ever seen! It really MUST have been delicious.

As for hybrids, I honestly don't think I've ever had one, or even seen any at the grocery store for that matter. I'm really curious about this pluot people keep mentioning though.

One Food Guy said...

Hi Tina, I like pluots, but recently discovered honeydew nectarines which are honeydew in color on the outside and smell sooo sooo delicious!

And there are at least 12 different kinds of pluot!

Trish - these aren't at all like GMO's - I won't touch genetically modified foods like corn...that stuff scares me!

Rose said...

My day is nearly half over, and I am still dragging. I may partake in another cup o' coffee soon :)

Aren't nectarines techinically hybrid fruit? (a cross between a peach and a plum?) I recently discovered this and felt strange while eating them. I mean, they taste good, but there's something strange about man-made fruit. Regardless, I'm pretty sure I'm still going to eat hybrid fruit.

Justine said...

That cantaloupe does look perfect-it's soooo orange and bright!

Only hybrid fruit I've tried is a grapple, which was okay. My boyfriend recently got some honeydew nectarines which he really liked. Most of the hybrids are more expensive, so I haven't tried many of them! Maybe I should before they all go out of season though...

Rosiecat said...

Happy Thursday, everyone!

Tina, your waffles look great. I've mysteriously run out of most of my breakfast foods, so my eyes lit up when I saw those ricotta-capped waffles!

I think some readers are confused about the difference between novel fruits generated by selective breeding and genetically-modified foods. Many, many, many of our plant foods are derived from selective breeding; corn is a great example of this. Human breeders select for things they like in particular plants, like lots of plump corn kernels, and use those corn plants to make the next generation of corn plants. I believe most grains and almonds are examples of foods we wouldn't have without selective breeding.

Genetically-modified foods, on the other hand, have been modified by geneticists to CONTAIN new genes, such as herbicide resistance genes. Monsanto is a corporation who has invested a lot of money in these types of plants, much to the chagrin of farmers and foodies everywhere. Genetically-modified foods are usually transgenic plants, meaning they contain foreign, laboratory-isolated genes that cannot be introduced into the plant by selective breeding alone.

I'm guessing most hybrid fruits are a result of selective breeding. Anybody have a more definitive answer on that question?

Sammie said...

Tina,
Thanks for the extra facts!!I am with you on the crisp clean sheets.
I have never tried a hybrid fruit, not sure if I have even seen any. I think I will be sticking to the real deal - I do not like the idea of modifying fruit and why they all tastes so good the way they are.

chandra said...

I love how you mix ricotta with things to make yummy spreads... the ricotta/buffalo sauce was great, so I can't wait to try this! :)

Denise said...

mmm... I don't think I ever had buffalo sauce... Meh... I even looked for it in the supermarket today. Not there...

Hangry Pants said...

I'm a little freaked out by hybrid fruits, although I'm not sure why because I eat processed foods (bars, crackers, ceareal, etc.). How exactly is a hybrid fruit "made?" I've never tried any, but that apple-banana sounds great - my two favorites!

Heather

Beth said...

One of my fave restaurants used to make a stuffed french toast with sweetened ricotta and strawberries....just sayin... :P

Jenny said...

Tina,

Glad to see Sophie made it to the blog! I have just found out about this awesome blog you are doing and I can't believe it! We are very similar in how we approach food and eating! My big problem is ice cream...I can't get enough! What have you found are the best ice creams which aren't too high in fat, but also have a great taste???

Sister said...

Peter - Those waffles and honey-ricotta spread look wicked yummy. Where can I buy some of the spread?

mom said...

Hi Christine, it's your mother again. Just a little tidbit of info for your commenters who have concerns about genetically motified produce...you know those annoying stikers on your fruits? well if it starts with a 8 it's a GMO (although very rare) and a 9 of course is organic.
My favorite hybrid is the pineapple watermelon!

eliza k. mundy said...

I'm glad to hear that other people (besides me) obsess about things like agave nectar.

My friends and I read your blog everyday at work, and I've got to say those honey-ricotta waffles look AMAZING! I know what I'm having for breakfast tomorrow.

Tina said...

Jenny,

Hi!!! Of course, Sophie made the blog! She is the CUTEST Frenchie ever! I am in love! :)

I'm not a huge ice cream person-- I'd much rather have a big piece of CAKE-- but I really like Ben & Jerry's low-fat ice creams. They have lots of all-natural ingredients, and usually just a small serving satisfies my craving. And, most important, the pint is small, so you really can't over-do-it! Also, sometimes I freeze regular yogurt and just add some chocolate chips or nuts to it. It's a good alternative to ice cream!

How's wedding planning going??? :)

Catherine said...

I love the pluot! Apricot taste with plum texture . . . crisp and juicy, instead of slightly mushy!

Dovey said...

As a grower of pluots, I feel compelled to clear up some of the confusion about pluots, and hybrid fruits in general. First, rosicat cleared up a lot with her comments on selective breeding. This is exactly how pluots are "created." Because plums and apricots are in the same genus, "prunus," they can be cross bred. This is done purely with controlled pollination. The pollen from one plant is hand painted onto the flower of another and the tree. This is done under netting to prevent any unintended pollination from bees. The seed within the resulting fruit contains the genetic result of the cross pollination. That seed must be grown to a mature tree before anyone knows what the resulting fruit will taste like. More often than not, the results are not desireable. Plant breeders make thousands upon thousands of these types of crosses each year, hoping to find the next great variety of stone fruit. The word "Pluot" is a trademark name registered to the breeder who is credited with the creation of the Pluot, Floyd Zaiger from Modesto, CA. Because many other breeders are now selling trees which are similar crosses, the fruit industry is undergoing a change to the name from pluot to plumcot. It was felt that this name makes it easier for consumers to grasp what they're eating. A pluot (plumcot) is not any one thing either. There are many different varieties with vastly different appearances and flavor profiles - each one is available for a few weeks before the next variety comes along.
I would also like to make your readers aware of the difference between hybrids and marketing terms. Remember that hybrids can only result from crosses of the same genetic family (i.e. dogs can't breed with cats but lions and tigers can breed). Fruits such as apple bananas, mango nectarines, honeydew nectarines are not crosses of those types of fruit. The first fruit in the name is usually used to describe characteristic of the fruit (think cherry tomato, banana squash). And finally, the grapple is merely a fuji apple which has been soaked in grape juice. It has the smell of grapes and the regular taste of an apple. This is probably too long for a normal blog response but I hope someone finds it useful information.